Friday, November 08, 2013

NAPHOPOMO - DAY 8

NOVEMBER 8, 2013

Have Kim will travel ...

(Click on image to see better)


Thursday, November 07, 2013

NAPHOPOMO - DAY 7

November 7, 2013

No wudu here!!!  Ladies bathroom at Penn State University, Main Campus, State College, PA, Pasquerilla Spiritual Center, Eisenhower Chapel

(Click image to see better)



Wednesday, November 06, 2013

NAPHOPOMO - DAY 6

NOVEMBER 6, 2013

My plan for these piles of leaves: scoop them up in the wheelbarrow and put them into my garden.  It's fenced in, so they won't blow away.  The little critters will munch them into mulch over the winter to nourish my garden soil :)

(Click on image to see it better)


Tuesday, November 05, 2013

NAPHOPOMO - DAY 5

November 5, 2013

At the Post & Lintel Dance Studio, Selinsgrove, PA

(Click photo to see better)


Monday, November 04, 2013

NAPHOPOMO - DAY 4

NOVEMBER 4, 2013 - DAY 4

(Click on the picture to get the full view)

Monday, Monday ... this guy has the life of Riley.  He'll probably lie here until lunch is called!

(taken with iPad)


Sunday, November 03, 2013

Saturday, November 02, 2013

NAPHOPOMO National Photo Posting Month

Hello Folks!

Read over at Chookooloonks' blog that November is National Photo Posting Month, or NAPHOPOMO.

Go over there and check out the details.

The idea is for photographers to post a photograph a day for each day during the month of November.  As usual, I am a day late, but I'm gonna participate!

If you want, you can, too.  Go over there, and add you name.  You can post your images to your blog, website, Flickr, Instagram, wherever.

Here's my first image, actually Day 2, November 2, 2013.  Not necessarily works of art for me, but exercises in seeing and disciplining myself to use my cameras on a daily basis:


Kitty: wherever you are, she wants to be.  And she wants to lie down right in the middle of whatever you're doing! (taken with an iPad)














Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Now That Ramadhaan and the Eids are Over ...

                     Eid Mubarak!, originally uploaded by Shaalom2Salaam (Safiyyah).

Salaams and Hello!

Insha Allaah this reaches you all in the best of health and iman, and infused with all the benefits of Ramadhaan and the Eids!

What are your plans for the upcoming year?

As for me, our mosque Sunday school started in September.  I'm teaching the kindergarten 1 and kindergarten 2 kids this year.  I REALLY love teaching the babies!  I have the Arabic classes for this age group. 

Also broke down and purchased a copy of Adobe's Lightroom (LR) 5 editing software.  I can't wait to start shooting in RAW format and editing in LR.  Believe it or not, I've been using the free version of Picasa all this time, lol.  I was taught in art school that an image should be good "SOTC," that is, "straight out of the camera," and should require minimal editing.  But LR is supposed to really perform digital dark room miracles.  So, stay tuned! 

I plan, Insha Allaah, to go to Turkey again in April.  This will be my fourth trip there.  I guess you can tell that I love Turkey!  Insha Allaah in a few years, I'll live there.  My plan is to be there for six months, and home here in America for six months.  Am thinking the rent an apartment in the Fatih area of Istanbul.  This trip, again, will be 5 cities in 10 days.  This time, hopefully, the itinerary will include Bursa. 

The big news is that I've obtained gallery space to exhibit and sell my jewelry.  I am very excited about this.  Once everything is set up, I'll take pictures and post them here so you can see. 

Gardening is over again for another year.  I've wintered over my garden, and am now focusing on cutting back the berry, rose, etc., bushes. 

And, finally, will go to NYC, to Harlem again in November on a photo shoot

What's new with you? 

Wednesday, September 18, 2013


Amish Boys, originally uploaded by Shaalom2Salaam (Safiyyah).
Copyright 2013, S. E. Jihad Levine, All Rights Reserved

Amish Produce Vendor, originally uploaded by Shaalom2Salaam (Safiyyah).

Copyright 2013, S. E. Jihad Levine, All Rights Reserved
 
I haven't been writing for awhile, but have been spending a lot of time in my garden and taking photographs. I always wanted to have images of Amish people in my portfolio. Finally got a few!

Sunday, July 28, 2013

Stealth Eating and Eating Disorders in Ramadhaan



As Salaamu Alaikum wa Rahmatullahi wa Barkatu!

Insha Allaah everyone's Ramadhaan is going well, and bringing forgiveness and blessings for you all.  Ameen!

Muslims the world over are fasting for this month of Ramadhaan, many going without food and water for long, long hours.  

Where I live, the thermometers hovered around 100 degrees or more, plus stifling humidity,  in the beginning of the holy month.

Facebook posts and Tweets and conversations with Muslims show that most of us are gladly enduring it, together with more prayer and more good deeds, to fulfill our obligation to Allaah!

BUT ...

What about those of us who cannot fast in Ramadhaan?  The Muslims who are temporarily ill, or those who suffer from chronic illnesses that fasting makes worse for various reasons?

Allaah t'ala in His infinite Wisdom and Mercy has given compensation to those Muslims who fall into this category.  We can make up fasts if we are temporarily ill, or feed hungry people if we are chronically ill.

I am a Muslim who falls into the chronically ill category.  The details aren't necessary (okay, they're private), but I'd like to share at least one of the details with you, and some of the issues it raises for me.

Along with my other chronic illnesses which necessitate medication during the fasting hours, I have an eating disorder.  Very few Muslims, until now because I'm writing about it, know this about me.

I have Bulimia and am an overeater.  There.  I said it.  I came out.  I'm out of the closet filled with dirty dishes, used candy wrappers, and pastry crumbs.  

Whew!  Alhamdulillah!

Ramadhaan has always presented a special challenge for me because it disrupts the eating routine I've developed in an attempt to keep my eating disorder in check.  

How?  Ramadhaan forces me to "stealth eat," that is, I hide and eat.

It's not so bad when I'm home alone during the day.  But when my fasting husband is home, off from work, or on the weekends, my eating disorder and "stealth eating" kicks into overdrive.  It also happens when I'm at work.

I relapse.

Muslims are encouraged not to eat in front of fasting persons in Ramadhaan. Some Muslim-majority countries even have laws against it.  My husband has told me that he REALLY doesn't mind if I eat in front of him.  He used to work in a juvenile facility where he had to supervise kids in the chow hall while he was fasting in Ramadhaan.  Alhamdulillah, my husband has the discipline of the Man of Steel (Superman), but still ... I feel guilty eating in front of him while he's home.

So I stealth eat.  And I relapse.

Add to that that I am a Muslim chaplain in a prison, surrounded by Muslims who are fasting, and some staff on the hunt to catch "fake Muslims" who stealth eat.  During Ramadhaan, I avoid the staff dining room.  Our Chapel is on top of our Visiting Room where there are food vending machines for the visitors.  So, I go down there and buy something to eat for lunch/dinner since it's too hot to bring lunch and eat in my car (I have no air conditioning in my car, lol).  I can't bring my own lunch to work because staff aren't allowed to bring food into the prison.

Ah, sneaking, even though I'm alone, down the back stairs of the Chapel to the Visiting Room, lights out after all the visitors and staff have left for the day, quickly pushing coins into the slots, buying something to eat, knowing all the while that the security cameras can see me, the officer monitoring the cameras probably snickering at my actions ...  

Me returning to my office upstairs, devouring my carbohydrate over-processed food (another trigger) ... only after I've locked the Chapel door so no one will come in and catch me ... 

When finished, rolling up the food wrappers and leftover scraps and putting it into another garbage can other than the one in my own office so the staff using my office after me doesn't figure out I'm not fasting ...

Hiding and eating, and waiting to be alone to eat is a relapse trigger for people in recovery from eating disorders.  So are the rituals associated with stealth eating like I've described above.  Sneaking off to eat or drink something and then quickly trying to hide the evidence when someone's coming ... horrified that the smell of your food may waft off to the noses of others and expose you,  is pure psychological torture.  

Bold inquiring minds want to know:  "Sister, are you fasting?"  When I became a Muslim, I was taught that it's bad manners to ask someone if they're fasting.  I think it would be better to say something like, "How's your Ramdhaan going?"  Then the non-fasting Muslim can honestly reply, "Alhamdulillah!  And yours?"  Because even if one isn't fasting, they can still be participating in the holy month by doing extra prayer and good deeds.

Asking a Muslim if they're fasting is also like asking them if they're giving extra sadaqa, attending taraweeh prayers, or reading the daily amounts of Qur'aan.  

Muslims don't ask other Muslims "Sister, are you doing extra good deeds?" or "Sister, are you getting all your Qur'aan reading in?"  So, why do they ask whether or not you're fasting?!

Worse yet is when the bold inquiring minds feel they're owed an explanation when they find out I'm not fasting.

The audacity of some Muslims for an explanation is not only an invasion of privacy, but is also a self-righteous, arrogant, and ignorant.  After all, everyone is a doctor or a sheikh in Ramadhaan, ready and willing to advise people like me, and eager to share the cases they personally know which they insist are exactly like mine.

Worse yet for me is the look on their faces when you tell them you can't fast.  It's the same look they get when you tell them you can't have or don't have children, or if you tell them you're not married.

You know that look:  the look that something is wrong with you.  

 It all causes a tremendous amount of guilt and shame, especially for Muslims with eating disorders, and as well, results in overeating.  It can make many of us feel like "bad and weak" Muslims.  Many of us don't feel like we're "a part of" something so spiritual and unique that is being experienced by the global ummah as a whole.  

I don't know what the answer is.  Truth be told, there's probably no answer.  But maybe writing and disclosing it is a start.

Say dua for me and other Muslims with eating disorders.